SI’s Greg Bishop Reflects on His Story About Tyler Hilinski

We don’t want everybody who might have early stage CTE, which may include me, to think this is going to destroy my life. Because now that we have hundreds of case studies of football players, many are living what would be seen as normal lives, until they reach an age where they don’t live normal lives anymore. Sometimes it’s not until their 50s, 60s or 70s where they start having symptoms that appear to be related to the disease.

I get why Tyler’s brother, Ryan, (who has committed to South Carolina), still wants to play. I don’t know if you could have convinced me to stop playing when I was young. This is a problem they just can’t feel. It’s hard to walk away. I mean, the short-term costs, which are known—lose your friends, have to find something else to do, lose your identity, lose your path. The short-term costs, which are high. The long-term costs to them are completely unknown because, let’s face it, a high school athlete does not have the capacity to understand the risk. It’s the same reason they can’t go serve in the military or can’t sign a legal contract. We’re struggling to have medical doctors interpret this evidence in an appropriate manner.

Kyle Shanahan first met Sean McVay in 2010. Shanahan, now 38, was the offensive coordinator for his father, Mike Shanahan, with the Redskins. McVay, now 32, was hired by Washington as an offensive quality control coach. I was basically Kyle’s assistant, says McVay, who would become the tight ends coach in the second of his four years under Shanahan.

I could tell within about five minutes that he was going to be a very good coach, says Kyle Shanahan. He was exactly what I wanted. Both young coaches entered the league as quality control guys under Jon Gruden with the Buccaneers—Shanahan in 2004-05, McVay in 200Quality control is the grunt work of coaching. You gather and organize the scouting data on other teams. You break down the same on your own team. You draw the plays the head coach or coordinator will install. Anything that makes the jobs of other coaches more efficient, you do.

Kam Chancellor among last of dying breed in NFL

Are hard-hitting safeties an endangered species in the NFL? That idea might have been reinforced to general managers, coaches and scouts amid Kam Chancellor’s recent semi-official retirement announcement.

According to Chancellor, the most intimidating player from the broken-up Legion of Boom, recent scans show the neck injury he suffered in November against the Cardinals has not healed. The news confirmed what Seahawks coach Pete Carroll has been saying all offseason about the likelihood of his four-time Pro Bowl safety’s career being over.

A common presumption is that a strong, powerful player like Chancellor is indestructible. At 6-3, 232 pounds, he was a defensive back who kept receivers, tight ends and running backs wary of running routes in his vicinity more so than any other in recent years.

The hope is that all players can be trained with proper tackling technique beginning at the high school and college levels; the technique then being further emphasized in the NFL. But sometimes, due to bad angles or bad luck, injuries occur even with proper technique.

On the play in which Chancellor was hurt, it appeared to be a normal tackle of Cardinals running back Andre Ellington after a 9-yard reception. But Chancellor got up slowly and stayed in the game for only one more play. After the game, the focus was more on Richard Sherman’s season-ending Achilles injury.

Janoris Jenkins is breaking his silence.

Just one week after his brother, William, was charged with aggravated manslaughter, the Giants cornerback took to Instagram on Thursday to open up about his strife and commemorate the friend he lost.

He mentioned this a time or two in his essay for The Players’ Tribune, which is destined to go down as one of the most well-intentioned but punishingly ill-advised applications of this template. To wit:

1. His praise of former general manager Garth Snow and former coach Doug Weight, while summarily ignoring the names of Lou Lamoriello, Barry Trotz or either of the team’s owners, sparked a cottage industry of speculation about whether he would have re-signed with the Islanders had his boys not been turfed. Which would mean, what, a 10-year reign of Doug Weight as head coach, no matter what the results were? Is that what we’re theorizing?

Guidry built an All-Star career with the help of his slider, and he is impressed with Severino’s.

You see, he’s got good control, Guidry said. I threw hard, I had a great slider, but I had good control. And that’s what he is, that’s why he’s so dominant.

One of Guidry’s favorite stories from the 1978 season involves a typical pregame conversation he would have with New York’s leadoff man that season, Mickey Rivers.

The left-hander would tell Rivers: Gimme two.

There are still scenarios where the Lakers could create more cap space. Renouncing the rights to Randle and waiving forward Luol Deng while stretching the remaining two years on his contract would get the Lakers to nearly $25 million in cap room. However, stretching Deng doesn’t seem worth it if the Lakers are merely signing players to one-year deals. In that case, it’s better to keep Deng’s salary on the books in case it can be cleared more easily via trade next summer as an expiring contract.

After all, Leonard isn’t the only option for the Lakers. Back when Butler was a restricted free agent with the Chicago Bulls, he expressed interest in signing an offer sheet with the Lakers, per Adrian Wojnarowski. And Thompson, whose father, Mychal, played for the Lakers and is now their color analyst for radio, would be a natural fit if he elects to leave the Warriors.

Adding a max free agent next summer is no certainty for the Lakers, but doing so while retaining their young talent either to develop alongside James or for additional trades remains their best chance of building a championship-caliber team.

Let’s take an early stab at what we can expect from the Lakers with LeBron utilizing projections based on the multi-year, predictive version of ESPN’s real plus-minus (RPM). Here’s how their rotation might look if they bring back Randle, considering only veteran players.

The Dolphins tried to move up to No. 1, but the price was far too steep.

Morris Claiborne sliding all the way to No. 8 makes for an attractive option for the Dolphins, but now the Cowboys are getting antsy about the player they were already willing to go up even higher to get. The Cowboys finally get the deal done and grab the player they wanted all along, while the Dolphins move down to No. 14 and cross their fingers that a player like Michael Floyd, Melvin Ingram or Quinton Coples is still available when they’re up again.

Now owners of the No. 5 and No. 22 picks thanks to the Browns, there’s less incentive for the Rams to pull off the big trade down with the Dallas Cowboys that eventually landed them defensive tackle Michael Brockers. St. Louis also has the chance to take running back Trent Richardson, a player who was considered the team’s top choice.

The Rams liked him so much that the Browns moved up from No. 4 to No. 3, a seemingly pointless trade, just to make sure nobody like St. Louis scooped them for the highly touted running back. In hindsight, the Rams were lucky to dodge Richardson but with him falling right in their laps, there’s no way they pass.

The Rock walks over to the wall between a flat-screen television and a projector screen and places his right hand flat on it before knocking on the wall a couple of times.

Then Johnson rests his muscular back against the wall.

This is what works for me, Johnson tells everyone of how he starts every morning. Excuse my language, my back is up against this m—–f—– … every day. It’s against this m—–f—– because that’s what I believe in, and when my back is against this m—–f—–, then there’s nowhere to go … but that way.

Johnson points both his index fingers forward, then continues his 30-minute-plus motivational talk, delivering the kind of insight that Fortune 500 companies pay big money to successful personalities to impart upon their leaders and employees. This past season, the Lakers brought in their own All-Star cast of movers and shakers in Johnson, Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, Hollywood heavyweight Jeffrey Katzenberg and Olympic and world champion sprinter Allyson Felix to share the secrets to their success as part of the Los Angeles Lakers Genius Series.

Los Angeles could still lure away Paul George. Where would OKC go from there?

What happens if George leaves for the Lakers or another team? What is next for the Thunder, who would face another star player departing in free agency? In this scenario, they aren’t just empty-handed, they actually would have less than before the trade.

To get George, the Thunder dealt Victor Oladipo, now an All-Star and 2017-18 Most Improved Player, and high-caliber versatile big Domantas Sabonis: two young players on long-term, controllable contracts.

A total of 11 players signed extensions last offseason, including three super max deals (John Wall, James Harden and Russell Westbrook).

Let’s look at all the major decisions facing All-Stars, rising rookies and their teams, plus their effect on potential trade talks.

The President also had some criticism for the Commissioner.

I heard this thing, they were so happy, the owners, Trump said. This Commissioner, where this guy comes from I have no [idea]. They’re paying him $40 million a year, and their ratings are down 20 percent. But you know why their ratings are down? Yes, the flag. But they’re also down because people find politics — in other words, hitting Trump, incorrectly, but hitting Trump — they find that to be much tougher, meaner, and more interesting than watching a football game. They actually do. And they’re watching the cable networks instead of watching football.

Ultimately, his modest offensive production with the Huskies should have been enough to scare off a team drafting so high. Thabeet averaged only 13.6 points in his junior season, up from 6.2 his first season. He wasn’t overwhelmingly powerful, so he had trouble holding his ground against NBA defenders. If Memphis had spent this choice more wisely, it might have had the last ingredient to a legit title contender.

Other unproductive 2s: Darko Milicic, Detroit Pistons, 2003; Michael Beasley, Miami Heat, 2008; Marvin Williams, Atlanta Hawks, 2005.